Upcoming Events

ILSI shares science to diverse audiences by hosting, sponsoring, and co-organizing a variety of events around the world. These include independent symposia; workshops; hands-on scientific training; and sessions held as part of the program of larger scientific and professional meetings.

Upcoming Events

ILSI Sessions at IUFoST 2022 Singapore

-, Singapore

ILSI supports three technical sessions at the IUFoST 2022, focusing on protein, food-omics, and packaging. Check out more details on this page.

Read more

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			Session 1: Future of Protein -Science, Innovation and Dietary Shifts  (October 31, 2022; 15-30-17:00 SGT)
							Expand
		Future of Protein
Prof. Michelle Colgrave, Professor, Future Protein Mission Leader, CSIRO, Australia

Estimates predict that 70 per cent more food will be required to feed the growing global population which will reach 9.7 billion by 2050. The challenge will be how to meet this global food gap while maintaining our planet's health. Australia's traditional animal and plant protein offer an opportunity to address this gap, with emerging sources of protein seen as complementary. We are witnessing changing dietary patterns, with increasing numbers of flexitarians, due to concerns over the environment, animal welfare and personal health and nutrition. In response to the growing demand for protein, technologists have been searching for cost-effective, resource-efficient and environmentally friendly protein technologies and solutions that can support traditional industries or create new industries. In this presentation, the opportunities and challenges in growing Australia's protein industries will be discussed.

Issues for Protein and Health - Identifying the Gaps

Prof. Christiani Jeyakumar Henry, Deputy Executive Director, SIFBI /CNRC, Singapore

Proteins are essential components for human life. Historically, our needs for protein have been met by the consumption of animal meat, fish, poultry, whole legumes, and cereals. With the global increase in the production of alternative protein-based foods, our access to protein foods has been revolutionized. Whilst embracing the new technologies used in the production of alternative protein foods, it is important for us to understand the nutritional, and physiological impact that the transition from eating conventional protein sources to the consumption of alternative proteins may have. This presentation will showcase and highlight the opportunities and challenges we face in the development of next-generation alternative proteins that not only have excellent taste, texture, and sensory properties but critically, have nutritional and health advantages. With increasing global population, we also need to consider how the "alternative protein" revolution could also include the nutritional needs of the less fortunate that approximate 3 billion people. This understanding will enable the next generation of alternative proteins to be widely accepted in our quest for planetary and human health.

Bioprocessing for Innovative Alternative Proteins - Cultivated meat, fermentation-derived products & plant-based meat alternatives  
Dr. Deepak Choudhury, Group Leader & Senior Scientist, Biomanufacturing Technology, Bioprocessing Technology Institute (BTI), A*STAR, Singapore

It won't be an overstatement to say that innovations in Alternative Proteins have taken the world by storm. There are increasing demands from informed consumers for nutritious, delicious, affordable, and easily accessible sources of alternative proteins as traditional products. As per the Good Food Institute (GFI) estimates, the alternative proteins companies have raised a total of $11.1 billion since 2010, half of which has been raised in 2021 itself! The heart of the alternative proteins' revolution lies in the bioprocessing of relevant cells, especially for cultivated meat and fermentation-derived products. The speaker will quickly dive into innovative alternative protein-based product development, vital technological challenges, and unique proposed solutions to make the scale-up of alternative proteins a reality. The session is proposed to touch upon aspects of cells, media, scaffolds, and bioreactor hardware development, as well as how fermentation is exploited as a critical technical tool to produce various ingredients.

 

 

Session 2: Food-omics - Rethinking Analytical Tools for Food Components and Their Health Impact (November 2, 2022; 1030-1200 SGT) Expand Proteomics - a versatile tool for revealing protein food value, allergenicity and food pathogens
Prof. Michelle Colgrave, Professor, Future Protein Mission Leader, CSIRO, Australia

A major challenge facing the world is providing protein security in the face of a growing global population. To this end, we have started exploring different crops and food sources from pulses to insects to algae and more. As we pivot towards these under-utilized resources, the potential exists for the increasing prevalence of allergy or cross-reactivity. Soy is a mainstay of the plant protein ingredient market, but new plant protein sources are emerging. For instance, lupin seeds possess high protein content (35-44%) and many health-promoting benefits (lowering cholesterol and blood pressure, managing glucose levels). But lupin also contains proteins that can trigger life-threatening anaphylaxis. Another complementary, sustainable source of protein to feed the world's growing population is insects. Insects have been consumed by people for millennia, but belong to the arthropod family, like crustaceans. Crustacean (shellfish) allergies are both relatively common and potentially severe; hence, the cross-reactivity of the immune system with insect proteins (e.g., tropomyosin and arginine kinase) is a potential health concern. The development of insects for food requires technology to explore their allergenic potential. In this presentation, the role of proteomics as a powerful tool to characterize both nutritional and antinutritional proteins in emerging protein sources will be discussed.

The intergenerational landscape of the human circulatory lipidome during pregnancy and early life
Prof. Markus Wenk, Professor, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore

Pregnancy and early child development are characterised by profound changes in physiology and metabolism. Here I will highlight results from our recent biochemical characterization of large Singapore birth cohorts. Mass spectrometry-based lipidomics was used to measure hundreds of circulating lipid metabolites in mothers and their offspring until early childhood. We have also characterized inter- and intra-individual (morning versus evening) variability of breastmilk. Collectively, these studies are providing valuable information maps to advance our knowledge in the fields of nutritional science, endocrinology, and pediatrics.

 

Measuring the health effects of food by metabolomics and other omics sciences: An example using volatilomics of several Zingiberaceae spices from Indonesia
Dr. Nancy Dewi Yuliana, Associate Professor, Department of Food Science and Technology, IPB University, Indonesia

Metabolomics is one of the emerging biomarker discovery tools that has received a lot of interest. It enables systematic investigation of a complex mixture, such as a botanical preparation or food product, which may be linked to the results of biological testing systems to identify active principles without the need for recurrent chromatographic procedures.  Metabolomics of the plant or food can be integrated with the metabolomics of the treated patients or experimental animals in order to correlate the compounds with their quantifiable health effects. Thus, how the chemicals normalize the human or experimental animal metabolome at distinct disease phases to achieve homeostasis can be investigated. In addition, metabolomics can be utilized to determine whether a substance is harmful to human health. In our lab, we conducted metabolomics-based research using several analytical platforms, primarily to describe bioactive chemicals in various plant-based foods. We recently focus on the volatile components of numerous Indonesian underutilized Zingiberaceae spices and their in vitro antioxidant, anti-diabetic, and immunomodulatory effects. Several compounds have been successfully identified. More research employing metabolomics method to link the identified chemicals with the altered metabolic pathways is being planned to provide insight on the processes behind their antioxidant, anti-diabetic, and immunomodulatory activities.

Session 3: Food Packaging - Safety and Sustainability in the Food System (Nov 3, 2022; 08:30-10:00 SGT) Expand

Novel bioactive packaging: Shelf-life extension, sustainability, and safety assessment

Prof. Cristina Nerin, Professor, Director of the Research Group GUIA, University of Zaragoza, Spain

The huge amount of plastic waste around the world has caused serious environmental problems, as the plastics used so far are not biodegradable. Efforts have been made in the last years to develop and produce biodegradable polymers able to be in contact with food. However, most of these new polymers do not have the required barrier properties for most of the food in the market. Thus, the limited barrier to gases prevents the packaged food to reach the market under the same conditions as the conventional plastics do. One good approach is to get bioactive materials, what means that these new materials will contain some additional agents which will extend the shelf-life of packaged food. These new materials are called "active packaging" and can act to prevent oxidation and/or microbial growth in packaged food. As active agents, both essential oils, food additives and nanoparticles can be used, providing their efficiency and safety. But not only the shelf-life extension and sustainability are important, as the food packaging requires as well to guaranty the safety in use of all packaging materials. The presentation will show the main points of the topics and illustrate them with selected examples, dealing with biomaterials, active packaging and their safety in use.

Towards circular economy with sustainable packaging innovation: Industry perspectives* tbc
Ms. Terrynz Tan, Sustainability Director, Tetra Pak Malaysia, Singapore, Philippines & Indonesia

 

Thailand's sustainable packaging roadmap and the regulatory development
Mrs. Sumalee Tangpitayakul, Advisor, Thai Packaging Association, Thailand

In Thailand, the Thai Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Ministry of Public Health (MOH) is the national authority for the safety of food packaging, while the Thai Industrial Standard Institute (TISI,) Ministry of Industry is responsible to develop various standards including food contact materials standard. Food contact materials standard covers both technical quality and safety of the product. Moreover, the Department of pollution control has set up the management of plastic waste road map for 2018-2030. The roadmap targets 1) to reduce and stop using single-use plastic, as well as 2) recycling plastic waste to create circular economy.  This presentation will share the revision of Notification No. 295 of Food Act (1979) which prohibit the use of recycled plastic for food packaging to the new Notification No.435 effective since June 2022 which allows the use of recycled polyethylene terephthalate (PET), and the changes of two voluntary compostable plastics standards to mandatory standards.

Click here to download the program, abstracts, and biography of the speakers.

Session 1: Future of Protein Session 2: Food-omics Session 3: Food Packaging

Sessions supported by

ILSI Global TGN_042922_ILSI_Logo_Southeast_Asia_Region (Removed BG) CSIRO_Wordmark+ANSA_CMYK

Ready to find out more?

Check out more on IUFoST 2022 Website.

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Structure and function of non-digestible carbohydrates in the gut microbiome

Together with proteins and fats, carbohydrates are one of the macronutrients in the human diet. Digestible carbohydrates, such as starch, starch-based products, sucrose, lactose, glucose and some sugar alcohols and unusual (and fairly rare) α-linked glucans, directly provide us with energy while other carbohydrates including high molecular weight polysaccharides, mainly from plant cell walls, provide us with dietary fibre. Carbohydrates which are efficiently digested in the small intestine are not available in appreciable quantities to act as substrates for gut bacteria. Some oligo- and polysaccharides, many of which are also dietary fibres, are resistant to digestion in the small intestines and enter the colon where they provide substrates for the complex bacterial ecosystem that resides there.

This session will focus on what we know and what we need to know about the structure-function relationship in dietary carbohydrates. Of particular focus will be the systematic effects of prebiotics, modelling prebiotic activity, as well as enabling technologies for future prebiotics.

Registration

For more details and registration, please visit the event's website.

Session outline

Chair: Alexandra Meynier, Mondelēz International, FR

  • Presentation 1: Structure-function relationships in dietary carbohydrates: what do we know and what do we need to know? - Bob Rastall, University of Reading, UK
  • Presentation 2: Systemic effects of prebiotics - Koen Venema, University of Maastricht, NL
  • Presentation 3: Modelling prebiotic activity - Maria Wiese, The Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research (TNO), NL
  • Presentation 4: Future prebiotics: enabling technologies - Javier Moreno, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, ES

This session is supported by ILSI Europe's Prebiotics Task Force.

Contact Information

Ms Naomi Venlet - ILSI Europe Scientific Project Manager (nvenlet@ilsieurope.be)

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ILSI Europe/ESTIV Lunch Session at the 21st International Congress of the European Society of Toxicology In Vitro (ESTIV 2022)

Tuesday, 22 November 2022 from 13.00-14.00 CET

ILSI Europe /ESTIV co-sponsored a Lunch Session on the Application of Non-Animal Methods and Concepts in Food Risk Assessment.

This session is supported by ILSI Europe's Alternatives to Animal Testing (AAT) and the Threshold of Toxicological Concern (TTC) Task Forces.

Chairs of the Session

  • Dr Isabelle Guelinckx, Scientific Program Director, ILSI Europe, BE
  • Dr Helena Kandarova, ERT, ESTIV President, Senior scientist at CEM, SAS, SK

Speakers

Talk 1: Non-animal methodologies for food safety risk assessment (15 min)
Speaker: Prof. Bas Blaauboer, Utrecht University, NL

Talk 2: Introduction to Thresholds of Toxicological Concern Concept and how in vitro methods and TTC complement each other (15 min)
Speaker: Dr Heli Hollnagel, Dow Europe, CH

Talk 3: High-Throughput-Screening: Challenges and Opportunities in food safety risk assessment (15 min)
Speaker: Dr Ans Punt, Wageningen University and Research Institute - RIKILT, NL

Panel discussion (10-15 min)

Booth

ILSI Europe will be present as exhibitor. We will showcase our current activities/scientific portfolio and discuss membership opportunities. Come visit us at booth no. 13!

About the ESTIV Congresses
The European Society of Toxicology In Vitro (ESTIV) is organized every two years. The ESTIV2022 congress aims to create a forum of scientists in a unique atmosphere for discussions and the exchange of knowledge. Its objective is also to promote contact between junior and senior researchers, students and toxicologists from European companies, governments and universities involved in the development and use of in vitro and in silico approaches. The congress is expected to include 500+ attendees and 30+ exhibitors.

For more details and registration, please visit the event's website.

Contact information:

ILSI Europe booth stand

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Prof. Michelle Colgrave, Professor, Future Protein Mission Leader, CSIRO, Australia

Estimates predict that 70 per cent more food will be required to feed the growing global population which will reach 9.7 billion by 2050. The challenge will be how to meet this global food gap while maintaining our planet's health. Australia's traditional animal and plant protein offer an opportunity to address this gap, with emerging sources of protein seen as complementary. We are witnessing changing dietary patterns, with increasing numbers of flexitarians, due to concerns over the environment, animal welfare and personal health and nutrition. In response to the growing demand for protein, technologists have been searching for cost-effective, resource-efficient and environmentally friendly protein technologies and solutions that can support traditional industries or create new industries. In this presentation, the opportunities and challenges in growing Australia's protein industries will be discussed.

Issues for Protein and Health - Identifying the Gaps

Prof. Christiani Jeyakumar Henry, Deputy Executive Director, SIFBI /CNRC, Singapore

Proteins are essential components for human life. Historically, our needs for protein have been met by the consumption of animal meat, fish, poultry, whole legumes, and cereals. With the global increase in the production of alternative protein-based foods, our access to protein foods has been revolutionized. Whilst embracing the new technologies used in the production of alternative protein foods, it is important for us to understand the nutritional, and physiological impact that the transition from eating conventional protein sources to the consumption of alternative proteins may have. This presentation will showcase and highlight the opportunities and challenges we face in the development of next-generation alternative proteins that not only have excellent taste, texture, and sensory properties but critically, have nutritional and health advantages. With increasing global population, we also need to consider how the "alternative protein" revolution could also include the nutritional needs of the less fortunate that approximate 3 billion people. This understanding will enable the next generation of alternative proteins to be widely accepted in our quest for planetary and human health.

Bioprocessing for Innovative Alternative Proteins - Cultivated meat, fermentation-derived products & plant-based meat alternatives  
Dr. Deepak Choudhury, Group Leader & Senior Scientist, Biomanufacturing Technology, Bioprocessing Technology Institute (BTI), A*STAR, Singapore

It won't be an overstatement to say that innovations in Alternative Proteins have taken the world by storm. There are increasing demands from informed consumers for nutritious, delicious, affordable, and easily accessible sources of alternative proteins as traditional products. As per the Good Food Institute (GFI) estimates, the alternative proteins companies have raised a total of $11.1 billion since 2010, half of which has been raised in 2021 itself! The heart of the alternative proteins' revolution lies in the bioprocessing of relevant cells, especially for cultivated meat and fermentation-derived products. The speaker will quickly dive into innovative alternative protein-based product development, vital technological challenges, and unique proposed solutions to make the scale-up of alternative proteins a reality. The session is proposed to touch upon aspects of cells, media, scaffolds, and bioreactor hardware development, as well as how fermentation is exploited as a critical technical tool to produce various ingredients.

 

 

Session 2: Food-omics - Rethinking Analytical Tools for Food Components and Their Health Impact (November 2, 2022; 1030-1200 SGT) Expand Proteomics - a versatile tool for revealing protein food value, allergenicity and food pathogens
Prof. Michelle Colgrave, Professor, Future Protein Mission Leader, CSIRO, Australia

A major challenge facing the world is providing protein security in the face of a growing global population. To this end, we have started exploring different crops and food sources from pulses to insects to algae and more. As we pivot towards these under-utilized resources, the potential exists for the increasing prevalence of allergy or cross-reactivity. Soy is a mainstay of the plant protein ingredient market, but new plant protein sources are emerging. For instance, lupin seeds possess high protein content (35-44%) and many health-promoting benefits (lowering cholesterol and blood pressure, managing glucose levels). But lupin also contains proteins that can trigger life-threatening anaphylaxis. Another complementary, sustainable source of protein to feed the world's growing population is insects. Insects have been consumed by people for millennia, but belong to the arthropod family, like crustaceans. Crustacean (shellfish) allergies are both relatively common and potentially severe; hence, the cross-reactivity of the immune system with insect proteins (e.g., tropomyosin and arginine kinase) is a potential health concern. The development of insects for food requires technology to explore their allergenic potential. In this presentation, the role of proteomics as a powerful tool to characterize both nutritional and antinutritional proteins in emerging protein sources will be discussed.

The intergenerational landscape of the human circulatory lipidome during pregnancy and early life
Prof. Markus Wenk, Professor, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore

Pregnancy and early child development are characterised by profound changes in physiology and metabolism. Here I will highlight results from our recent biochemical characterization of large Singapore birth cohorts. Mass spectrometry-based lipidomics was used to measure hundreds of circulating lipid metabolites in mothers and their offspring until early childhood. We have also characterized inter- and intra-individual (morning versus evening) variability of breastmilk. Collectively, these studies are providing valuable information maps to advance our knowledge in the fields of nutritional science, endocrinology, and pediatrics.

 

Measuring the health effects of food by metabolomics and other omics sciences: An example using volatilomics of several Zingiberaceae spices from Indonesia
Dr. Nancy Dewi Yuliana, Associate Professor, Department of Food Science and Technology, IPB University, Indonesia

Metabolomics is one of the emerging biomarker discovery tools that has received a lot of interest. It enables systematic investigation of a complex mixture, such as a botanical preparation or food product, which may be linked to the results of biological testing systems to identify active principles without the need for recurrent chromatographic procedures.  Metabolomics of the plant or food can be integrated with the metabolomics of the treated patients or experimental animals in order to correlate the compounds with their quantifiable health effects. Thus, how the chemicals normalize the human or experimental animal metabolome at distinct disease phases to achieve homeostasis can be investigated. In addition, metabolomics can be utilized to determine whether a substance is harmful to human health. In our lab, we conducted metabolomics-based research using several analytical platforms, primarily to describe bioactive chemicals in various plant-based foods. We recently focus on the volatile components of numerous Indonesian underutilized Zingiberaceae spices and their in vitro antioxidant, anti-diabetic, and immunomodulatory effects. Several compounds have been successfully identified. More research employing metabolomics method to link the identified chemicals with the altered metabolic pathways is being planned to provide insight on the processes behind their antioxidant, anti-diabetic, and immunomodulatory activities.

Session 3: Food Packaging - Safety and Sustainability in the Food System (Nov 3, 2022; 08:30-10:00 SGT) Expand

Novel bioactive packaging: Shelf-life extension, sustainability, and safety assessment

Prof. Cristina Nerin, Professor, Director of the Research Group GUIA, University of Zaragoza, Spain

The huge amount of plastic waste around the world has caused serious environmental problems, as the plastics used so far are not biodegradable. Efforts have been made in the last years to develop and produce biodegradable polymers able to be in contact with food. However, most of these new polymers do not have the required barrier properties for most of the food in the market. Thus, the limited barrier to gases prevents the packaged food to reach the market under the same conditions as the conventional plastics do. One good approach is to get bioactive materials, what means that these new materials will contain some additional agents which will extend the shelf-life of packaged food. These new materials are called "active packaging" and can act to prevent oxidation and/or microbial growth in packaged food. As active agents, both essential oils, food additives and nanoparticles can be used, providing their efficiency and safety. But not only the shelf-life extension and sustainability are important, as the food packaging requires as well to guaranty the safety in use of all packaging materials. The presentation will show the main points of the topics and illustrate them with selected examples, dealing with biomaterials, active packaging and their safety in use.

Towards circular economy with sustainable packaging innovation: Industry perspectives* tbc
Ms. Terrynz Tan, Sustainability Director, Tetra Pak Malaysia, Singapore, Philippines & Indonesia

 

Thailand's sustainable packaging roadmap and the regulatory development
Mrs. Sumalee Tangpitayakul, Advisor, Thai Packaging Association, Thailand

In Thailand, the Thai Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Ministry of Public Health (MOH) is the national authority for the safety of food packaging, while the Thai Industrial Standard Institute (TISI,) Ministry of Industry is responsible to develop various standards including food contact materials standard. Food contact materials standard covers both technical quality and safety of the product. Moreover, the Department of pollution control has set up the management of plastic waste road map for 2018-2030. The roadmap targets 1) to reduce and stop using single-use plastic, as well as 2) recycling plastic waste to create circular economy.  This presentation will share the revision of Notification No. 295 of Food Act (1979) which prohibit the use of recycled plastic for food packaging to the new Notification No.435 effective since June 2022 which allows the use of recycled polyethylene terephthalate (PET), and the changes of two voluntary compostable plastics standards to mandatory standards.

Click here to download the program, abstracts, and biography of the speakers.

Session 1: Future of Protein Session 2: Food-omics Session 3: Food Packaging

Sessions supported by

ILSI Global TGN_042922_ILSI_Logo_Southeast_Asia_Region (Removed BG) CSIRO_Wordmark+ANSA_CMYK

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